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Birthday...and request for cat advice - tasabian [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
tasabian

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Birthday...and request for cat advice [Jan. 14th, 2009|09:54 pm]
tasabian
Happy birthday kantayra!


To the cat knowledgeable: any advice for helping female cats recuperate post-spaying? Is it hard to persuade kitties to eat afterwards? Should I centralize food/water/litter box in one room? How long before they start to feel better?

All suggestions are very welcome :)
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: suzycat
2009-01-15 04:29 am (UTC)
It's been a while but IIRC they're up and about pretty quickly. Cats will just keep themselves to themselves and sleep when they're not well or injured. If you put their food and water and litter close, but not right next to each other obviously, on the first night back that should be OK.

When my current cat and his brother were neutered they were acting fairly normal right away, but I think speying takes a little more out of a cat (QUITE LITERALLY) than mere ball-removal.
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[User Picture]From: tasabian
2009-01-15 04:35 am (UTC)
That's good to hear. I hope they bounce back quickly - they've proved resilient so far!
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[User Picture]From: kantayra
2009-01-15 04:29 am (UTC)
Heeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

Thanks so much! :D
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[User Picture]From: tasabian
2009-01-15 04:32 am (UTC)
You're welcome! Have a great day.
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[User Picture]From: iibnf
2009-01-15 11:53 am (UTC)
I had four females done at once about 20 years ago, last time I had girls. They all got up and about pretty much as soon as I got them home. I shut them in the bathroom with their stuff for the afternoon, but they were tough little ferals.

I did lose one cat to a bad desexing, though, which is why I generally prefer boys. They just lick their lost nuts a bit and get over it as soon as they regain conciousness. "Where's my balls? Oh hey, lunch!"
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[User Picture]From: tasabian
2009-01-16 03:49 am (UTC)
Boy cats sound much easier!
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[User Picture]From: iibnf
2009-01-15 11:53 am (UTC)
Mind you, when I had a ferret desexed, I had to take 2 weeks off work to nurse him. Man, those things are fragile!

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[User Picture]From: tasabian
2009-01-16 03:49 am (UTC)
Poor little guy!
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[User Picture]From: gyri
2009-01-15 12:47 pm (UTC)
Vets usually recommend you try to keep the cat as quiet as possible--i.e., separate her from other cats who may try to roughhouse with her, as well as other animals--for at least a few days after the surgery. Putting her food, water and litter box in one room is a good idea, especially if she needs to climb stairs to get to and from them.

Cats recover remarkably fast from this surgery. She should be wanting to eat by the morning after; if she isn't eating, and seems very lethargic, I'd call the vet. Also keep your eye on the incision site, and watch for redness, swelling and any discharge. She may lick at it a bit, but excessive licking needs to be prevented (she may need to have one of those satellite-dish collars put on her).

Your vet should give you detailed instructions for post-surgery care.
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[User Picture]From: tasabian
2009-01-16 03:50 am (UTC)
Thanks for the tips! I'm really hoping we can manage without the satellite dish collar, but I guess it may come to that.

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[User Picture]From: gyri
2009-01-16 12:46 pm (UTC)
Let me know how your kitty does! When is she scheduled for the surgery?
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[User Picture]From: tasabian
2009-01-17 12:40 am (UTC)
Two kitties, both going in on Friday! I will definitely let you know how we manage.
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[User Picture]From: luthorienne
2009-01-15 07:02 pm (UTC)
My experience is that kitties in this state are emotionally needy, and you should make yourself available for comfort and meaningful discussion. Yes, it's a good idea to centralize box/food/water/bed in a nice, warm room, placing box as far away from the other items as practical. Your kitteh will not be able to climb or jump up on things for a few days, so you may want to provide steps or a ramp up to bed or sofa, if those are fave resting places. If it's hard to get her to eat and drink, I have a couple of suggestions: drizzle a little tuna juice on the food to make it especially interesting; offer a little (JUST a little, because she really doesn't need the poos on top of everything else) toniclax on your finger to stimulate appetite; and consider hand feeding. If she won't drink, try mixing a little water into the food to make it soupy.
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[User Picture]From: tasabian
2009-01-16 03:51 am (UTC)
Thanks very much! These are helpful tips: I will make sure to have some tuna on hand and have steps for all the favourite sleeping places.
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[User Picture]From: luthorienne
2009-01-21 07:09 pm (UTC)
How's kitty doing?
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[User Picture]From: tasabian
2009-01-22 03:11 am (UTC)
Tomorrow is the day! Kitties are fine but I'm the one fretting!
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[User Picture]From: jakrar
2009-01-23 08:16 pm (UTC)
Oh, the anteater! *snorfles* But why am I hearing Gandalf's voice saying, "You shall not pass"?

I hope your cat or cats recover quickly; they usually seem to heal faster than humans. Or maybe it's just that they bitch so much less....
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[User Picture]From: tasabian
2009-01-24 04:35 am (UTC)
But why am I hearing Gandalf's voice saying, "You shall not pass"?
I think that's an accurate translation of anteater body language!
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